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Poker Hand Ranges

It is said that poker is not a game of your cards but situations. This is an experiment where we won’t know our hand until the river. We will try and figure out our opponent’s hand before we know our own and by that, we can make better decisions. Sound crazy? Read on. 

Stack sizes:

Phil ($200,000) – SB $500

You ($200,000) – BB $1,000

Phil raises to $3,000 from the SB and you call. We don’t raise because it wont help narrow his range and then were stuck playing a big pot out of position.

(Remember, it doesn’t matter what we have. The point in this experiment is to try and figure out Phil’s exact hand so we know how to play our hand).

The flop comes Jc 5h 6h

We check and Phil bets $4,000. His range at this point is still anything from nothing to three of a kind. He could have any 2 cards. Calling won’t help us figure out his range and so we should raise. If he folds, great. If he raises there are only 8 hands he could have and only a number of hands can call.

So by doing anything but calling we can figure out his hand range. We raise to $12,000.

Phil decides to call. Since he raises two-pair, sets, and over pairs but calls with draws and weak pairs we can put Phil on a pair of fives, sixes, jacks, middle pocket pairs, straight draws and flush draws.

The turn is the Ks bringing one over card. Now that we know what Phil’s range is, we can figure out the most profitable move. To most of Phil’s range the K of spades is a scary card. If we make a bet, most pairs are going to fold and only strong draws will continue. If we can get Phil to fold the majority of his range, the bet will be profitable. The pot is $30,000 and we bet $22,000. Phil takes some time and calls again. Since we believed most pairs would fold to a bet we can take weak pairs out of his range and leave flush draws, straight draws and two pairs that he caught with the king in.

The river is a blank leaving only the straight to connect. [Jc 5h 6h Ks 2s]

At this point, we leave Phil with these hands:

Flush draws (missed but maybe caught a king)

Straight draws (34 got there but most missed)

KJ, K6, K5

At this point, we have 2 choices: bet or check. Betting will fold worse hands and better hands will call. However if you check, a better hand will bet and also a worse hand. Based on that information we can make the correct decision. Since most of Phil’s range consists of missed draws we should check-call a strong or decent pair and be right most of the time. If we haven’t made a hand or have a weak pair, we should bet. Since he’s always folding missed draws and always calling with two-pair, we don’t have to fire a big bet like 80 into 100. If we fire something like 55 into 100, we can get the missed draws to fold and when we do get called, we don’t lose that much.

In this scenario, we have [8x 9x] for the missed gutshot straight draw. The pot is $74,000 and we bet $38,600. Phil calls and shows [Ks 6s] of spades, damn. Even though it was the wrong move at the time, the move will be profitable in the long run due to how his hand range compares to ours.

Replay the hand now while you know what you have and think of Phil’s decisions with [Ks 6s]. Then go vice-versa and be in Phil’s position to see what he did. It’s very interesting because from Phil’s point of view, the bluff looks stupid but its actually very calculated and will work in the long run.

Play Texas Holdem With Your Husband

 Come Friday night and my husband is off to have some poker time with this buddies. If I complain, I become the nag and if I stay silent then I suffer in loneliness. Both ways, I was the one who was in pain while he was the one who got away very easily, while putting all the blame on me alone.

It can be quite exasperating if you are one of those wives whose husband just can’t wait for Friday to come so that he can get away with the guys and have fun all alone, while you are at home expecting to spend some time with him.

When you do try to explain to him about how much you are yearning to spend some good quality time with him, you get ‘the look’, or the argument about how he drudges all week with no fun and how this is his only fun time and things like that. It seems as if nothing can get him convinced to stay home with you.

In addition, there are not even so many events such as action movies or car shows that might interest him. You will soon run out of these events. After trying several things, I came up with something that not only kept him with me for one Friday night but he has been spending his weekends with me for over two years now. And the cherry on the cake is that not only am I happy about it, but he too is excited and happy about it.

If you feel the same way that I felt all that time trying to keep him home, then read on to find out the secret that has kept him with me, happy and all.

The Revelation

After a careful thought as to what I could do about this, I came up with the thought that if he could not get interested in what I wanted him to do, I could certainly take up an interest in his hobby and for my husband, it was poker.

Therefore, I took it upon myself to teach myself poker until I could be good enough to play with him and even challenge him into playing a game with me. The stakes would be losing his guys time, if I won.

The Beginning

After having made up my mind, I started devouring every book I could lay my hands upon, reading about Texas Holdem. I decided it was better to focus on a single game rather than the multitude of them.

Thus, I started reading about it, in books and from all the information I could get from the internet.

The Progress

As I read, I felt I knew the basics well enough to try them out. So I started playing in online poker games whenever I could. I even played in some of our local casinos for some cash.

It was enjoyable for me because I was learning fast and easy and was making some money too, in the process.

The Final Challenge

When I though I had practised enough and was ready, I talked to him about his Friday games. The reaction was what I had expected, a long monologue of his hard work and no fun time and so on.

Now, the time was ripe to make the strike. I told him that I would accompany him to his games. I got the answer that only players were allowed. To that I replied that it could possibly be not so hard to play the game, if he was able to play then surely I could too.

That was it for him. He challenged me to play with him. I made the stakes clear.

The Result

What happened next was history. We had such a swell time playing. Of course, I did not win. However, I did manage to get him interested in playing with me. The interest lasts till today, it has been two years since that time and we still do it and our love has been blooming ever since.

At times, you just need to get interested.

Movie Review: Lucky You

After months of holding back their cards, Warner Bros. is finally releasing their romantic, poker playing dramady Lucky You. It’s been nearly a year since the picture was originally slated to debut, and the studio has upped the ante by choosing to open Lucky You as the sole alternative to perhaps this summer’s biggest blockbuster. Is Lucky You a royal flush or was the studio and talent behind the picture just bluffing?

On paper Lucky You sounded like a fantastic idea. With Curtis Hanson, the writer and director of “L.A. Confidential” and the surprisingly successful “In Her Shoes”, at the helm, plus the superb acting talents of Eric Bana and Robert Duvall, combined with the box office gold mine that is Drew Barrymore, how could Lucky You go wrong? To make things short and simple, televised poker is a snooze fest, so why would a dramatization be any different?

This is a shame too, especially since last year’s Casino Royale proved just how wildly exciting a game of Texas Holdem can be when the stakes are right. Whether it was the sheer number of card games featured throughout the picture’s hefty running time that desensitizes audiences, or perhaps it was the unexciting camera work and lack of energy in the editing, when the climax of Lucky You hits, you just want the principle tournament players to get it over with and fold.

Eric Bana plays Huck, a compulsive gambler who won’t admit to his addiction. The son of a two-time World Series poker champion, Huck spends his time in Las Vegas casinos where he has earned a reputation as a reckless player. Determined to step out of his father’s shadow, we meet Huck on his quest to raise the ten thousand dollar entry fee for a seat in the World Series poker championship.

Of course, since life is full of surprises, Huck meets a girl. Not just any girl mind you, but Drew Barrymore’s Billy, a girl he has absolutely no chemistry with, yet the film’s narrative structure demands they fall in love. Why? The reason is simple; she has to be the one to help him “change his game” and “change his life”.

At one point in the film Huck’s father, played by the legendary Robert Duvall, gives his son some interesting advice that perhaps the filmmakers should have taken. Referring to Huck’s cautious take on life and his aggressive poker playing the actor advises “You play cards the way you should lead your life. And you lead your life the way you should play cards”.

Perhaps if director Curtis Hanson had taken a few more risks with Lucky You, instead of trying to play the safe hand, he might have made an entertaining film. The premise is simple enough that an Oscar nominated director should be able to draw it out to a formidable conclusion, and aside from Barrymore’s wooden, poker-face-like acting, the performances are very solid.

While it is possible that the intention of Hanson was to showcase the wasteful life of compulsive gamblers with slow, drawn out dolly shots that have more fades transitioning them together than a student film, that really isn’t what attracts audiences to want to see a film set in Vegas. Take the highly underrated and under-seen film The Cooler for example. There is a sexiness to the gambling, an exciting style which breaks up the monotony and repetition of the games. While this would have helped the feel of Lucky You tremendously, one might wonder if this infusion of style would have detracted from showcasing Huck as a degenerate gambler. It may have given his compulsion a sexier look and feel, but it would have helped the picture’s ungodly pacing. Plus with all the ups and downs Huck faces outside of the poker table, audiences still would have seen the destructive path his lifestyle incurs.

With delay after delay one has to wonder why Warner Bros. didn’t just cut their losses and burn this card. Lucky You is a hand that would be better dealt to audiences during the January dumping grounds, when studios typically bring out the worst in their slate. Instead it had the misfortune of being released in a season where it will quickly get lost in the shuffle. While this move will inevitably lose the studio lots of playing chips, it is hard for me to sympathize since those of us who get stuck watching Lucky You are truly the unlucky ones.

How To Pull Out of a Big Downswing in Internet No-Limit Hold’em Poker

If you play winning poker for a long period of time, it’s inevitable because of the nature of the game that you will suffer a prolonged losing streak known as a downswing. Sometimes it’s going to just be a case of getting unlucky over and over again, sometimes it’s going to be because of a bad habit you picked up somewhere without realizing it, and sometimes it’s going to be a combination of both. A downswing in an Internet poker game is even more brutal because you are getting so many more hands per hour than in live games, so you can lose money much more quickly. In high-variance big-bet games like no-limit hold’em, this is compounded by how volatile the stacks are because of the wide range of bet-sizes you’ll face. The psychological effects of dealing with a downswing can lead to anger, depression, and a lower long-term win-rate, so we’re going to look at how to maintain our profits during these losing periods.

The first thing you need to do if you play online poker and multi-table no-limit hold’em is to cut your number of tables down. Normally you should drop one-third to one-half of the tables you normally play. We do this for two reasons. First, when you cut these tables you’ll be able to take more time on your decisions, which will help you to more quickly discover if you’re playing badly or not. Second, when you remove tables you’ll make your hands per hour rate go down, which leads to lower variance, which makes it harder to continue your downswing. While your hourly win-rate might suffer a bit in the short-term, it’s better in the long-term to play fewer tables so you can turn things around.

After dropping some tables, you need to objectively evaluate your play and decide if you need to move down in stakes for some period of time. Moving down one level is normally going to be sufficient, but moving down two levels wouldn’t hurt. The idea of moving down is to face easier competition while you figure out what in your normal poker game has went astray. In no-limit hold’em, it only takes one or two small leaks to take a solid, winning player to a break even or slightly losing player, so it’s absolutely critical that you find what’s causing you problems. You can only achieve this with objective feedback from yourself or others regarding your play.

If you drop tables and move down in stakes and you still can’t seem to win after a while, then something major is probably going on and you’ll want to re-evaluate your mental state and consider hiring a coach. While poker coaches can be expensive (anywhere from $50 an hour to $2000+ an hour) it will be money well spent if you hire a coach with a long track record of helping players get back on track and increase their winnings. You have to think of these adjustments as investments for your poker future, which after the initial cost will pay you great dividends in the form of bigger profits in online poker.

 

How to Learn Heads-Up No-Limit Texas Hold ‘Em

No-limit Texas hold’em has exploded in popularity recently thanks to the broadcasting of live hole cards on television shows like the World Series of Poker (WSOP) or the World Poker Tour (WPT). The game is commonly played with up to 10 players at a single table. Although many new players are used to this style, heads-up is a different breed of poker which can be hard to adjust to for a beginner.

Is Heads-Up Hold ‘Em Right for Me?

Unlike a full table, heads-up hold’em is mono y mono. Your single opponent is your main focus the entire course of a match. At a full table, a player could patiently sit around waiting for good cards without paying too much attention to his opponents. A straightforward, basic strategy could be very profitable. In heads-up play, you will be playing nearly every single hand. As a result, the play is more wild, aggressive, and exciting. Betting, bluffing, and raising all the time results in bigger fluctuations in your bankroll. Only choose heads-up if you are prepared to handle the swings.

Preflop Starting Hands

In heads-up poker, you will always either be the small blind or the big blind. Because you will always have money invested in the hand, it is foolish to fold the small blind. It is worth it to literally call every single hand. In heads-up hold’em, your cards are not the most important thing. Your opponent’s cards should dictate how you play and bet.

Post-Flop Strategy

You will be seeing a lot of flops heads-up, so be aggressive. Constantly throw out bluffs and bets on the flop, the turn, and the river. By betting, you give your opponent the chance to fold and win the pot. Betting also maximizes value when you have a winning hand and might even encourage a raise. Although aggressive play has many rewards, it is not a free pass to bet all the time. Sometimes you will bluff huge and need to fold because you are beat. Your only goal is to defeat your opponent, not win every pot. The timing of your betting should be governed by your reads.

Reading Your Opponent

This is the single most important thing to master in heads-up. No other game relies on reads so heavily than heads-up no-limit hold’em. Notice how your opponent bets. Does he raise a lot before the flop? Will she bluff twice in a row? Answering questions like these are the key to winning. Also observe your opponent’s reactions to your bets. Bet different amounts until you know how much he will call and fold. Maximize value on winning hands and try to bluff risking the lowest amount of chips.

Turbo or Non-Turbo                                                                                                                 

Turbo heads-up sit-n-goes (SNG) are a quick, popular way to play heads-up. The blinds increase more rapidly than normal which ends the match sooner. Non-turbo SNGs are longer and a result you see more hands. This allows for more play between opponents. Turbo heads up SNGs are better for experienced players and might overwhelm a novice at first.

Managing Stakes and Bankroll 

You can play for virtually any amount of money heads-up with stakes as little as $2 or $5. At least 20 buy-ins are needed to play heads-up. It is not uncommon for profitable poker players to have downswings and lose 5 to 10 games in a row. 20 buy-ins allow for some breathing room, but you can play with a smaller bankroll if you feel comfortable.

Final Thoughts

Start out at the smallest limits offered or even play for fun. The more hands you play, the better you will be able to react to certain situations. As your skills increase, you might adjust your strategy or try fancier plays. Focus on figuring out and reading your opponent no matter what level you are playing at. Other flaws in your game will improve over time, but the ability to read your opponent separates the winning poker players from the fish.

How Linesmakers Come Up with Their Point Spreads

Line movements is characterized by pure excitement throughout the course of a day for any betting enthusiast. From its creation to its fruition, line movement dictate the point spread according to public behavior. Savvy handicappers analyze the intricacies of every line movement – when it moves, by how much it moves, and why it moves. The line is the epitomé of sports bets – remember, one half point can make or break your wager.

Line movements are divided into three phases. During the early phrase when they´ve just been created by the Stardust Casino sportsbook, high stakes bettors take first shots at the line – choosing a team to wager for/against. In order to be one of the select few to bet at this time, bettors have to go through a lottery system. This lottery system filters out everyone betting cheap money and strictly aims for the high rollers of the betting industry who have made a name for themselves with their inspired play. These sharp bettors find plenty of satisfaction in being the first to bet baby lines: they make the decision instead of relying on shopping lines. High stake bettor bet with thousands of dollars in each and every game, and Las Vegas naturally respects whatever betting decision they make knowing lots of money is on the line. Depending on these high stakes bettors decisions, the line is moved respectably.

Early line moves serve as a gauge to the linesmakers. The lottery bettors who choose sides dictate line movement simply by betting on one side. If the majority of these sharp bettors choose one side, it is because it presents great value. Naturally, linesmakers will adjust the lines to encourage betting on the other side. Early moves always act as good indicators of which direction lines will head as well. For this reason, lines are almost pinpoint in nature – with required decisions to make by choosing either one. Suppose you have the Knicks – Cavaliers game and the line opens at the beginning of the week (days prior to the game) with a Knicks -2 spread at Madison Square Garden. If you strongly believe the Knicks will win the game, you will naturally want to choose -2 by placing a wager now instead of waiting for line movement to rise. If you like the Cavaliers, you can wait -2 to become -4, increasing the likelihood of winning the bet on the Cavaliers side.

Of course, line movement does not have to move in one direction at all times. A line could move in one side during the early phase and turn in the opposite direction during the middle of the week. This is caused by the publics betting decisions. Lots of factors can play into influencing line movement: for instance, breaking news indicates that the Knicks starting power forward has been charged with a misdemeanor and was suspended. Automatically, the line will move in the Cavaliers favor, perhaps moving to Knicks -1 or even Cavaliers +2. 500 $400 bets towards one side can move a line 1/2 point. Why is line movement so important? For starters, it is an indicator of where the public is betting. If you believe in the ¨fading the public¨ mantra, this information could be of service to you. A common rule of thumb is that teams with a point moved towards them is a bad bet.

This is because the value has gone from that side and there is a tendency for the oddsmakers to prevail. Betting against the line is a solid choice, although nothing is guaranteed. Gauging line movement and shopping for the best lines is just as important as maintaining a solid research regimen. It is one of the many trick of the trade that should be implemented into your betting habits. Remember, line movement that has moved a ½ is significant because it highlights the betting decisions of the public. The public is the No. 1 indicator of line movement – not injuries or gametime situations. Get into the game by becoming a line movement aficionado today!

Full House Poker Leveling Tips and Hints

Full House Poker released on Xbox Live Arcade on Wednesday March 16, 2011, for $10. It features both casual and tournament matches in single player or multiplayer modes. In addition to working towards growing their chip count gamers also have an experience level to work on as well. The chips and experience levels are independent of each other so even bad poker players can earn experience points. Getting more chips requires winning poker hands, but leveling up ones experience only requires playing. To help speed up the experience leveling process in Full House Poker here are some tips and hints.

Full House Poker Leveling Tips – Play Style

Full House Poker rewards you with experience for playing smart, but you do not have to win poker hands to earn experience. It does help to win hands, but folding a losing hand also nets you a nice amount of experience. Try to play conservatively and only bid on the deal if you have a pair or a face card. After the flop if you do not have a playable hand you need to check or fold. Losing hands earns very little experience while folding or winning nets you a lot of experience.

Full House Poker Leveling Tips – Pro Takedown

The head to head Pro Takedown matches give you experience not just for playing but also include a large bonus for winning. However, even losing a Pro Takedown gives you a runner up 600 XP bonus. Since there is only two people playing the hands go fast which allows for more experience to be earned quickly. Try to pull the opponent into a good hand early and go all in. If you win you get a lot of experience after just a few hands, but even if you bust you can just play again. If you find a Pro that you can beat easily because of their play style keep playing them over and over to quickly get a lot of experience.

Full House Poker Leveling Tips – Texas Heat

The Texas Heat events in Full House Poker also gives a lot of bonus experience if you play well. There are three tiers of tables and the better you play the higher up the tables you move. Each table up ha progressively better experience payouts. Additionally, there are numerous bonuses at the end of each Texas Heat 30 minute episode. Texas Heat events run in groups so try to make all of them you can to level up quickly by earning the extra bonuses. Remember to play conservatively so that you do not lose any major amounts of chips and can stay at the head table.

Eight Tips on How to Become an Unsuccessful Bettor

There are thousands of articles out there teaching you how to become a successful bettor. Each and every one of them promises to teach the “Holy Grail” and yet I don’t see a lot of people living off sports betting. I decided instead of giving you another 8 superb tips on how to succeed, I will give you 8 tips on how to fail. No one can guarantee you success in gambling, but I can guarantee you failure if you follow the eight tips  below. Knowing this you have to avoid them at all cost. Here they are:

  1. Bet on your favorite team – This one is probably the easiest of them all and speaks for itself. Betting only on your favorite team will sure bring you down soon enough.
  1. Bet on the lower coefficient – Remember the odds that the bookmaker gives you are not the “true” probabilities, but the probabilities based on the public opinion.
  1. Bet “big” money on teams with odds around 1.1 or lower – Sure this one looks logical, but how many times can you win? Once, twice , five times, even seven? Let’s see you bet 100$ each time and you win 10$, you win 9 times and you lose once. That’s right 90% winning streak will guarantee you a loss of 10$. Just for comparison top tipsters get around 60% winning streaks.
  1. “Go with the flow” – So your friends bet on the away team, everyone that you know actually did, so you did it as well even though your opinion was a draw? Learn this, public opinion does not matter at all.
  1. Be greedy, the more you win, the higher the bet – Actually successful bettors bet a small percentage of their accounts each time, no matter what the size of the account is or their profit.
  1. Get even after a loss – Great now you have lost, emotions kick in and you want to break even, if it’s possible today. This is great!!! For the bookmaker though, when you are angry you tend to make irrational decisions.
  1. Bet under the influence – Do you know why casinos serve alcohol for free? No, not because they are that nice! People make decisions that otherwise wouldn’t when they are under the influence.

  1. Bet on irrational odds – This is my favorite. Bet on odds like, “Who’s going to get the first corner kick” or “Who’s going to get a red card” and etc.. You might get lucky once or twice, but lucky is only a good name for a dog. In the career of a successful sports bettor luck has very little to do with it.

So now that you know what you have to do to achieve failure, you should easily find your way to success.

Best Tournament Poker Books

I have been playing poker since the time I was a teenager. The learning curve was very slow for me. It was hard for me to understand how this game was anything but luck. Once I started learning more about the game I learned how some people can consistently play and win. Here are some books that helped me in my poker journey.

Raiser’s Edge by Bertrand Grospellier, Lee Nelson and others

Raiser’s Edge is the latest book from the “Kill” series authors. This book builds from the theories found in the other two books. You learn why the aggressive and hyper-aggressive styles are profitable ones. It teaches you to play this way while also learning to exploit other people who are playing the same style. A questionable theory is proposed in this book that a person’s ethnicity is related to the way they play the game of poker. While this may not always be true it is worth the read nonetheless. Raiser’s Edge is on our must have list for any tournament player today.

Winning Poker Tournaments One Hand Vol 1  amp; 2 at a Time by Eric Lynch, Jo n Turner, and Jon van Fleet

Written by three of the brightest minds in online tournament poker this book is a must have for any serious online grinder. These three combined have over $6 million lifetime winnings between theme. Each of them have different perspectives on the game and their collective knowledge should help any player become better. They decided to break it down into two volumes, the first covering fundamentals and the second showing you what to do once in the money. These three will take you from the first hand to taking your pictures with the money and show you what to do each step of the way.

The Poker Tournament Formula by Arnold Snyder

Arnold Snyder may not be a popular name but this man knows his tournament poker. His book especially applies to low stakes tournaments. He leads you through important topics such as hand strength, reading your opponents, position, aggression as well as many other topics that are important to tournament poker. Snyder gives insight into what gave him a return on investment (ROI) of over 300%.

Tournament Poker for Advanced Players by David Sklansky

Written by one of the most brilliant minds in poker, this book is great for anyone who is looking to take their game to the next level. Sklansky first explains the differences between cash games and tournament poker. He then explains the differences in depth. The key to tournament poker is learning how to adjust your play for different stages of the tournament. Your play when the different starts will differ greatly from the play at the end of the tournament. Sklansky discusses what to do from the beginning to the end of any tournament.

Some other books that I have found useful in my poker career can be found in these articles I have written.

Top Four Tournament Poker Books.

Top Five Sit-N-Go Poker Books

Aladdin Poker Room Exceeds Expectations

On my first trip out to Las Vegas, I had a plan in mind. I was going there to enjoy the scenery, see everything that there was to see, and play poker at as many of the major casinos as possible. Once I visited the Bellagio, the Wynn, the MGM Grand, and the Mirage, I decided that it was time to do some picking and choosing among the other casinos. My goal was to play some good poker and make a little bit of money, but I also wanted to gain the value of a good experience. Since my favorite movie as a kid was Aladdin, I decided to visit the Aladdin Casino poker room. While it obviously was not to the level of any of the previously mentioned poker rooms, the Aladdin was a pretty good place to sit down and play a few hands.

The most attractive quality of the Aladdin poker room is that it sits in a very secluded area of the Aladdin casino. In the past year, the resort has made a large number of changes to this room in their renovation project. Along with those changes were many  cosmetic changes that keep the Aladdin ahead of most of the smaller casinos. Since Planet Hollywood is now the rightful owner of this casino and room, they have taken it upon themselves to create an enjoyable experience. Inside the room, players will find comfortable chairs and brand new tables. The only drawback to the comfort and convenience of this poker room is that they only have one large flatscreen television. In the end, that leaves huge sports fans like me needing a little bit more.

The poker play at the Aladdin was surprisingly easy. As a small casino, I suspected that it would be filled with locals who knew how to play the game. This simply was not the case. The lower limit games, such as the no-limit $1/$2 game, were filled with amateurs, fish, and otherwise inadequate poker players. According to my friends in Las Vegas, the room seems to be attracting more local players with each passing week, but for now, it is home to players who simply like to donate their money.

The no-limit action happens at three different blind prices. The aforementioned $1/$2 game is the most popular, but games range as high as $5/$10. In addition, there is a good selection of limit poker and Omaha. While they do offer some $60 buy-in tournaments, there is really nothing noteworthy going on in this poker room’s tournament scene. There are better tournaments elsewhere.

Overall, the Aladdin exceeded my expectations on comfort and competition. As it becomes more popular, the level of play will increase. In the next year, though, this casino should be one that you include on your poker rotation. The people are nice and they keep you coming back for more.